School Occupational Therapy (OT) Program

In these videos we will discuss how co-regulation helps to develop self-regulation and the effect of stress on the brain and behaviour. This will help us to understand and appreciate the difference between stress behaviour and misbehaviour.

Co-Regulation Video #1

Co-Regulation Video #2

Co-Regulation Video #3

Co-Regulation Video #4

I would like to introduce myself and the School Therapy Occupational Therapy (OT) Program. My name is Anne-Marie Peters and I am one of the OTs for the Three Oaks family and schools and French schools in Prince County. I am very excited to be working at your child’s school for the 2020-2021 school year. I will be at Athena Consolidated School every Day 2 beginning early October.

Occupational Therapists work with children of all ages and know a lot about children’s development in the areas of: 

  • fine motor (i.e., small muscle coordination)
  • gross motor (i.e., large muscle coordination)
  • visual motor (i.e., eye and hand coordination)
  • sensory processing (i.e., how we respond to sensory information in our environment)
  • environmental set-up (i.e., ensuring the environment works to meet everyone’s needs from seating to wheelchair accessibility, etc.).  

The focus of the School Therapy OT program will be to work together with classroom teachers and school staff to support children’s motor and sensory development in order to assist children in: achieving their learning goals; successfully participating in school and most importantly feeling good about school! To do this, I will be spending time in: classrooms; gym, music and library classes, on the playground and in small group settings. Throughout the day, I will be offering guidance, suggestions and tips.

Feel free to contact me if you have any questions about the School Therapy OT Program. I can be contacted at the school on Day 2 or at aspeters@ihis.org or 902 303-2224. I look forward to a wonderful school year working together with school staff, students and you as parents/guardians!

Anne-Marie Peters, OT Reg. (PEI)
Occupational Therapist, School Therapy OT Program

Did you know?

Good old-fashioned puzzles are one of the best activities for exercising your child's brain, eyes and finger movements! Puzzles can be done on a snowy day at home and are great for children of all ages! Building puzzles with your child can help with reading, printing and overall learning in school! Remember...the best learning happens with using your hands, instead of using technology. Happy Building!

Pillow fights, tug-of war, and "rough-housing" with your child is a great way for improving overall body awareness and strength. This will help your child with their endurance while sitting and listening in class.

Playing games such as "Red light, Green light", "Simon Says", and "Freeze Dance" with your child, can help to develop your child's ability to focus, follow directions and control impulses. These are important skills to help your child learn to self-regulate throughout their school day. 

Drawing, colouring and art projects (using scissors and glue) are great ways to improve your child's motor skills. Colouring, cutting and drawing at home will build your child's confidence when they do these activities at school.

Playing outside during the winter is a great way to improve your child's strength and balance. Building snow forts and snowshoeing helps develop strength, balance and coordination. These skills will help your child in physical education (gym) and with printing in the classroom.